FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book

 FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
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additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
additional image for FROM MONS TO ARMISTICE Great War Diary Col Anderson 11th Hussars Book
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Description

This is the hitherto unpublished Great War diary of Lieutenant-Colonel R J P Anderson C.M.G. D.S.O, Commander of 11th Hussars, 1915 - 1920. Written in his own hand, this facsimile copy of his original diaries recounts his experiences, thoughts and actions during the war. Commencing on the 15th August 1914, the day the regiment embarked for France, the diary continues a day-by-day account right up till the armistice and beyond. The many battles are recounted in detail: the Battle of Mons, the Retreat from Mons, Nery, Le Cateau etc. But perhaps more interestingly it recounts the general life and duties of a regimental, and for a brief period a brigade, commander during the First World War. Whilst there have been many diaries detailing the experiences of the private soldier in the trenches of the Western Front and several written by junior officers, there is a paucity of records published detailing the experiences of middle-ranking officers at the regimental command level. This diary intends to help fill in that gap. Thousands of individual diary entries are recorded here representing a wealth of previously unpublished material of huge interest and importance to the student and historian of the Great War. In addition to his Great War experiences, Anderson also details his life as a senior Courts-Martial officer in Ireland during the Irish Rebellion. He records the growth of Sinn Fein and the final months of the Empire in Southern Ireland. This is again proves to be a unique record of the evolving political, military and social situation at the time, from this hitherto unpublished record. An important primary source book for any comprehensive archive or significant private library of the First World War. ABOUT THE BOOK This diary is a pure facsimile copy of the original. When considering publishing, we felt strongly that we did not have the right to edit or sanitise his diary and whilst reading a transcript would have provided the necessary information, we felt that it compares pretty poorly to the experience of reading a soldiers actual words in his own handwriting. So this is what this book is: Anderson’s original diary reprinted page for page as it was left when Anderson finally put down his pen. The only addition we have made is a short introduction, the rest is Anderson’s experience of the war in his day-by-day account. Fortunately Anderson’s writing is for the most part pretty clear to read, and whilst some entries are a little harder to read than others and some sentences are illegible, these make up a very small proportion of his near 400 page, 80,000 word long diary. Fortunately Anderson’s writing is for the most part pretty clear to read, and whilst some entries are a little harder to read than others and some sentences are illegible, these make up a very small proportion of his near 400 page, 80,000 word long diary. His approach to writing is very different from that of the numerous private soldier’s diaries of the Great War. Despite getting married just four days before he left for France, he very seldom mentions his new wife or any of his family; instead he displays a paternalistic attitude to his men and concern for his horses. Perhaps indicative of his professional military background and officer’s training (in comparison to many diaries written by the later volunteers and conscripts) almost every entry refers predominantly to military matters, the military situation, strategy etc. Peppering the descriptions of battles, locations, events, tactics, terrain and strategy, are lists and accounts of his dead and wounded men. This hitherto unpublished source is an inestimable wealth of information to the historian or student of the Great War. At the same time it is also a genuinely interesting read for those whose interest in military history is more tepid. The diary is after all a continual first-hand account and narrative of one of the two most destructive wars in history. Yet in spite of this Anderson still displays numerous endearing examples of classic British understatement, describing being shelled by Howitzers that very nearly killed him: "a most uncomfortable time". A truly remarkable account of a British officer who served in and later commanded one of the most venerable British cavalry regiments throughout such a destructive conflict. Approximate Details: Paperback, Measurements: 20cm x 16cm, Weight: 500 grams, Pages: About 400